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Gastrin blood test

Peptic ulcer - gastrin blood test

The gastrin blood test measures the amount of the hormone gastrin in blood.

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  • Nuclear stress test - Animation

    Nuclear stress test

    Animation

  • Nuclear stress test - Animation

    Your heart is the engine that keeps blood pumping throughout your body. When your heart doesn't work as well as it should, your body can't function normally. If you've had heart problems in the past, your doctor may recommend that you have a test to see how well your blood is flowing into your heart. Let's talk today about thallium and sestamibi stress test, also known as nuclear stress test. This is your heart. It's job is to receive oxygen-poor blood from your body, send it to your lungs to pick up fresh oxygen, then pump that oxygen-rich blood back out to your body. When your heart doesn't get enough blood, it can't work as well as it should. So, why would you need a thallium or sestamibi stress test?Well, your doctor may recommend that you have this test to find out why you're having chest pain, find out which treatment is best for your heart disease, check whether a treatment you've already had, such as medicine or surgery, is working, or see if you have coronary artery disease. So, what happens during the stress test?Well, you'll start to prepare for the stress test a day ahead of time. Don't eat anything the night before the test, and avoid any foods that contain caffeine for a full day beforehand. You'll have to skip your morning cup of coffee or tea, and avoid sodas and chocolate. Your doctor will let you know if you need to stop taking any of your medicines before the test. When you arrive at the doctor's office or medical center for the test, an intravenous, or IV line will be placed into your vein. Through this line, a weakly radioactive substance will be injected into one of your veins. You'll lie down and wait for 15 to 45 minutes, and a special camera will take pictures as the thallium or sestamibi substance moves into your heart during a period of rest. Then you'll walk on a treadmill with EKG electrodes monitoring your heart activity. Once you've reached your maximum level of exercise you'll get another injection of the radioactive substance and your heart will be scanned to see how well the blood is flowing during a period of "stress. " If you can't exercise, you'll get a drug that will simulate the effects of exercise by making your heart beat faster. During the test, some people feel chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, or a fast heartbeat. Let the person who is doing the test know right away if you don't feel well. So, what do the test results mean?Well, your doctor will compare the first set of images to the second set, to see if you have heart disease or your heart disease is getting worse. If blood is flowing well through the arteries of your heart, then your test is normal. If blood isn't flowing well, you may have a blockage in one or more of the coronary arteries of your heart. In that case, you may need to have another test, or an angiography, stent or heart bypass surgery to open up a blocked artery. A stress test can help your doctor see how well your heart is working. Then, you can find out together which treatments you'll need to get your blood pumping smoothly again.

  • Cholesterol and triglyceride test - Animation

    Cholesterol and triglyceride test

    Animation

  • Cholesterol and triglyceride test - Animation

    Maybe you've been eating fast food more often than you should, or you're not getting your recommended two-and-a-half hours of exercise each week. Or, it could be that you smoke, or your blood pressure is too high. Well, for whatever reason, you may be concerned about your risk of getting heart disease. Well, a few tests can help you learn that risk, so you can start making healthy lifestyle changes to reduce it. A coronary risk profile is a group of blood tests that measure your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Why is it important to know these levels? Because if you have too much of these substances in your blood from eating foods like burgers and French fries, they can clog your arteries. Eventually your arteries can become so clogged that you'll have a heart attack or stroke. Men should have their cholesterol tested by the time they're 35. Women should have it checked by age 45. If you have a condition like diabetes, heart disease, stroke, or high blood pressure, have your cholesterol checked now, no matter what your age. To measure your cholesterol, your doctor will give you a blood test. If you're also having your triglyceride level checked, you may be told not to eat or drink anything for 8 to 12 hours before the test. Depending upon your heart risk, the doctor may measure just your total cholesterol level, or your total cholesterol along with your LDL, or "bad" cholesterol, HDL, or "good" cholesterol, and triglycerides. If you're of average risk of getting heart disease, your goal is to have total cholesterol of less than 200 milligrams per deciliter, LDL cholesterol lower than 130 milligrams per deciliter, HDL cholesterol higher than 40 milligrams per deciliter if you're a man, or 50 if you're a woman -- the higher the better, and triglycerides of less than 150 also, the lower the better. Although some illnesses, like arthritis, can raise your cholesterol level, generally having high cholesterol means that you're at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. It's a sign you need to work harder to keep your heart healthy. If your cholesterol levels are normal, that's great! That means that you're eating right, you're exercising, and you're taking good care of your health. You don't need to have another cholesterol test for about five years. But if your cholesterol level is high, or you've already got heart disease, high blood pressure, or diabetes, you'll need to have your cholesterol levels checked more often. Keeping close tabs on your cholesterol and triglyceride levels is one way that you can take charge of your health, and change it for the better.

  • Blood clot test

    Blood clot test

    The bleeding time test is used to evaluate how well a person's blood is clotting. The test evaluates how long it takes the vessels cut to constrict and how long it takes for platelets in the blood to seal off the hole. Blood vessel defects, platelet function defects, along with many other conditions can result in prolonged bleeding time.

    Blood clot test

    illustration

  • PSA blood test

    PSA blood test

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a glycoprotein in the cytoplasm of prostatic epithelial cells. It can be detected in the blood of all adult men. The PSA level is increased in men with prostate cancer but can also be increased somewhat in other disorders of the prostate.

    PSA blood test

    illustration

  • Blood test

    Blood test

    To monitor the amount of glucose within the blood a person with diabetes should test their blood regularly. The procedure is quite simple and can often be done at home.

    Blood test

    illustration

  • Blood gases test

    Blood gases test

    The blood gases test is performed by collecting a sample of blood through a needle from an artery. The test is used to evaluate respiratory diseases and conditions that affect the lungs, and it is used to determine the effectiveness of oxygen therapy. The acid-base component of the test also gives information on how well the kidneys are functioning.

    Blood gases test

    illustration

  • Fecal occult blood test

    Fecal occult blood test

    A fecal occult blood test is a noninvasive test that detects the presence of hidden blood in the stool. Blood in the stool that is not visible is often the first, and in many cases the only, warning sign that a person has colorectal disease, including colon cancer.

    Fecal occult blood test

    illustration

  • Cytochrome b5 reductase blood test

    Cytochrome b5 reductase blood test

    Cytochrome b5 reductase is a blood enzyme that serves to maintain adequate iron levels in the red blood cells to maximize their oxygen-carrying capacity.

    Cytochrome b5 reductase blood test

    illustration

  • Blood test

    Blood test

    Blood is drawn from a vein (venipuncture), usually from the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. A needle is inserted into the vein, and the blood is collected in an air-tight vial or a syringe. Preparation may vary depending on the specific test.

    Blood test

    illustration

  • Stomach acid test

    Stomach acid test

    The stomach acid test is a test to evaluate the capacity of the parietal cells in the stomach to secrete acid. The test is performed by aspirating fluid through a tube that is inserted down the esophagus to the stomach. This test may be used to test for the cause of ulcers, to detect duodenal regurgitation, to evaluate the cause of malabsorption, to assess the adequacy of anti-ulcer medications, and to evaluate secretion of gastrin.

    Stomach acid test

    illustration

  • Duplex/doppler ultrasound test

    Duplex/doppler ultrasound test

    The duplex/doppler ultrasound test examines the blood flow in the major arteries and veins in the arms and legs. The test uses duplex ultrasonagraphy to visualize the blood flow and doppler ultrasonagraphy provides an audio means to hear the blood flow. This test is done as an alternative to arteriography and venography and may help diagnose abnormalities in an artery or vein.

    Duplex/doppler ultrasound test

    illustration

  • Nitroblue tetrazolium test

    Nitroblue tetrazolium test

    Nitroblue tetrazolium test is a blood test that measures the ability of the immune system to convert the colorless nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) to a deep blue. This test is performed as a screen for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). If an individual has CGD, the white cells in their blood will not turn blue when exposed to the NBT.

    Nitroblue tetrazolium test

    illustration

  • White blood cell count  - series

    White blood cell count - series

    Presentation

  • Complete blood count - series

    Complete blood count - series

    Presentation

  • Growth hormone stimulation test - series

    Growth hormone stimulation test - series

    Presentation

  • Monitoring blood glucose - Series

    Monitoring blood glucose - Series

    Presentation

  • Nuclear stress test - Animation

    Nuclear stress test

    Animation

  • Nuclear stress test - Animation

    Your heart is the engine that keeps blood pumping throughout your body. When your heart doesn't work as well as it should, your body can't function normally. If you've had heart problems in the past, your doctor may recommend that you have a test to see how well your blood is flowing into your heart. Let's talk today about thallium and sestamibi stress test, also known as nuclear stress test. This is your heart. It's job is to receive oxygen-poor blood from your body, send it to your lungs to pick up fresh oxygen, then pump that oxygen-rich blood back out to your body. When your heart doesn't get enough blood, it can't work as well as it should. So, why would you need a thallium or sestamibi stress test?Well, your doctor may recommend that you have this test to find out why you're having chest pain, find out which treatment is best for your heart disease, check whether a treatment you've already had, such as medicine or surgery, is working, or see if you have coronary artery disease. So, what happens during the stress test?Well, you'll start to prepare for the stress test a day ahead of time. Don't eat anything the night before the test, and avoid any foods that contain caffeine for a full day beforehand. You'll have to skip your morning cup of coffee or tea, and avoid sodas and chocolate. Your doctor will let you know if you need to stop taking any of your medicines before the test. When you arrive at the doctor's office or medical center for the test, an intravenous, or IV line will be placed into your vein. Through this line, a weakly radioactive substance will be injected into one of your veins. You'll lie down and wait for 15 to 45 minutes, and a special camera will take pictures as the thallium or sestamibi substance moves into your heart during a period of rest. Then you'll walk on a treadmill with EKG electrodes monitoring your heart activity. Once you've reached your maximum level of exercise you'll get another injection of the radioactive substance and your heart will be scanned to see how well the blood is flowing during a period of "stress. " If you can't exercise, you'll get a drug that will simulate the effects of exercise by making your heart beat faster. During the test, some people feel chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, or a fast heartbeat. Let the person who is doing the test know right away if you don't feel well. So, what do the test results mean?Well, your doctor will compare the first set of images to the second set, to see if you have heart disease or your heart disease is getting worse. If blood is flowing well through the arteries of your heart, then your test is normal. If blood isn't flowing well, you may have a blockage in one or more of the coronary arteries of your heart. In that case, you may need to have another test, or an angiography, stent or heart bypass surgery to open up a blocked artery. A stress test can help your doctor see how well your heart is working. Then, you can find out together which treatments you'll need to get your blood pumping smoothly again.

  • Cholesterol and triglyceride test - Animation

    Cholesterol and triglyceride test

    Animation

  • Cholesterol and triglyceride test - Animation

    Maybe you've been eating fast food more often than you should, or you're not getting your recommended two-and-a-half hours of exercise each week. Or, it could be that you smoke, or your blood pressure is too high. Well, for whatever reason, you may be concerned about your risk of getting heart disease. Well, a few tests can help you learn that risk, so you can start making healthy lifestyle changes to reduce it. A coronary risk profile is a group of blood tests that measure your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Why is it important to know these levels? Because if you have too much of these substances in your blood from eating foods like burgers and French fries, they can clog your arteries. Eventually your arteries can become so clogged that you'll have a heart attack or stroke. Men should have their cholesterol tested by the time they're 35. Women should have it checked by age 45. If you have a condition like diabetes, heart disease, stroke, or high blood pressure, have your cholesterol checked now, no matter what your age. To measure your cholesterol, your doctor will give you a blood test. If you're also having your triglyceride level checked, you may be told not to eat or drink anything for 8 to 12 hours before the test. Depending upon your heart risk, the doctor may measure just your total cholesterol level, or your total cholesterol along with your LDL, or "bad" cholesterol, HDL, or "good" cholesterol, and triglycerides. If you're of average risk of getting heart disease, your goal is to have total cholesterol of less than 200 milligrams per deciliter, LDL cholesterol lower than 130 milligrams per deciliter, HDL cholesterol higher than 40 milligrams per deciliter if you're a man, or 50 if you're a woman -- the higher the better, and triglycerides of less than 150 also, the lower the better. Although some illnesses, like arthritis, can raise your cholesterol level, generally having high cholesterol means that you're at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. It's a sign you need to work harder to keep your heart healthy. If your cholesterol levels are normal, that's great! That means that you're eating right, you're exercising, and you're taking good care of your health. You don't need to have another cholesterol test for about five years. But if your cholesterol level is high, or you've already got heart disease, high blood pressure, or diabetes, you'll need to have your cholesterol levels checked more often. Keeping close tabs on your cholesterol and triglyceride levels is one way that you can take charge of your health, and change it for the better.

  • Blood clot test

    Blood clot test

    The bleeding time test is used to evaluate how well a person's blood is clotting. The test evaluates how long it takes the vessels cut to constrict and how long it takes for platelets in the blood to seal off the hole. Blood vessel defects, platelet function defects, along with many other conditions can result in prolonged bleeding time.

    Blood clot test

    illustration

  • PSA blood test

    PSA blood test

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a glycoprotein in the cytoplasm of prostatic epithelial cells. It can be detected in the blood of all adult men. The PSA level is increased in men with prostate cancer but can also be increased somewhat in other disorders of the prostate.

    PSA blood test

    illustration

  • Blood test

    Blood test

    To monitor the amount of glucose within the blood a person with diabetes should test their blood regularly. The procedure is quite simple and can often be done at home.

    Blood test

    illustration

  • Blood gases test

    Blood gases test

    The blood gases test is performed by collecting a sample of blood through a needle from an artery. The test is used to evaluate respiratory diseases and conditions that affect the lungs, and it is used to determine the effectiveness of oxygen therapy. The acid-base component of the test also gives information on how well the kidneys are functioning.

    Blood gases test

    illustration

  • Fecal occult blood test

    Fecal occult blood test

    A fecal occult blood test is a noninvasive test that detects the presence of hidden blood in the stool. Blood in the stool that is not visible is often the first, and in many cases the only, warning sign that a person has colorectal disease, including colon cancer.

    Fecal occult blood test

    illustration

  • Cytochrome b5 reductase blood test

    Cytochrome b5 reductase blood test

    Cytochrome b5 reductase is a blood enzyme that serves to maintain adequate iron levels in the red blood cells to maximize their oxygen-carrying capacity.

    Cytochrome b5 reductase blood test

    illustration

  • Blood test

    Blood test

    Blood is drawn from a vein (venipuncture), usually from the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. A needle is inserted into the vein, and the blood is collected in an air-tight vial or a syringe. Preparation may vary depending on the specific test.

    Blood test

    illustration

  • Stomach acid test

    Stomach acid test

    The stomach acid test is a test to evaluate the capacity of the parietal cells in the stomach to secrete acid. The test is performed by aspirating fluid through a tube that is inserted down the esophagus to the stomach. This test may be used to test for the cause of ulcers, to detect duodenal regurgitation, to evaluate the cause of malabsorption, to assess the adequacy of anti-ulcer medications, and to evaluate secretion of gastrin.

    Stomach acid test

    illustration

  • Duplex/doppler ultrasound test

    Duplex/doppler ultrasound test

    The duplex/doppler ultrasound test examines the blood flow in the major arteries and veins in the arms and legs. The test uses duplex ultrasonagraphy to visualize the blood flow and doppler ultrasonagraphy provides an audio means to hear the blood flow. This test is done as an alternative to arteriography and venography and may help diagnose abnormalities in an artery or vein.

    Duplex/doppler ultrasound test

    illustration

  • Nitroblue tetrazolium test

    Nitroblue tetrazolium test

    Nitroblue tetrazolium test is a blood test that measures the ability of the immune system to convert the colorless nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) to a deep blue. This test is performed as a screen for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). If an individual has CGD, the white cells in their blood will not turn blue when exposed to the NBT.

    Nitroblue tetrazolium test

    illustration

  • White blood cell count  - series

    White blood cell count - series

    Presentation

  • Complete blood count - series

    Complete blood count - series

    Presentation

  • Growth hormone stimulation test - series

    Growth hormone stimulation test - series

    Presentation

  • Monitoring blood glucose - Series

    Monitoring blood glucose - Series

    Presentation

Review Date: 8/25/2017

Reviewed By: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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