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Exercising and asthma at school

Asthma - exercise school; Exercise - induced asthma - school

Sometimes exercise triggers asthma symptoms. This is called exercise-induced asthma (EIA).

The symptoms of EIA are coughing, wheezing, a feeling of tightness in your chest, or shortness of breath. Most times, these symptoms start soon after you stop exercising. Some people may have symptoms after they start exercising.

Be Careful Where and When the Student Exercises

Having asthma symptoms when exercising does not mean a student cannot or should not exercise. Taking part in recess, physical education (PE), and after-school sports is important for all children. And children with asthma should not have to sit on the side lines.

School staff and coaches should know your child's asthma triggers, such as:

  • Cold or dry air. Breathing through the nose or wearing a scarf or mask over the mouth may help.
  • Polluted air.
  • Freshly mowed fields or lawns.

A student with asthma should warm up before exercising and cool down afterward.

Helping a Child With Asthma Stay Active in School

Read the student's asthma action plan. Make sure staff members know where it is kept. Discuss the action plan with the parent or guardian. Find out what type of activities the student can do and for how long.

Teachers, coaches, and other school staff should know the symptoms of asthma and what to do if a student has an asthma attack. Help the student take the medicines listed in their asthma action plan.

Encourage the student to participate in PE. To help prevent an asthma attack, modify PE activities. For example, a running program might be set up this way:

  • Walk the whole distance
  • Run part of the distance
  • Alternate running and walking

Some exercises may be less likely to trigger asthma symptoms.

  • Swimming is often a good choice. The warm, moist air may keep symptoms away.
  • Football, baseball, and other sports that have periods of inactivity are less likely to trigger asthma symptoms.

Activities that are more intense and sustained, such as long periods of running, basketball, and soccer, are more likely to trigger asthma symptoms.

Taking Asthma Medicines Before Exercise

If an asthma action plan instructs the student to take medicines before exercising, remind the student to do so. These may include short-acting and long-acting medicines.

Short-acting, or quick-relief, medicines:

  • Are taken 10 to 15 minutes before exercise
  • Can help for up to 4 hours

Long-acting inhaled medicines:

  • Are used at least 30 minutes before exercise
  • Last up to 12 hours

Children can take long-acting medicines before school and they will help for the whole day.

References

Bergstrom J, Kurth M, Hieman BE, et al. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement website. Health care guideline: diagnosis and management of asthma. 11th ed. www.icsi.org/_asset/rsjvnd/Asthma-Interactive0712.pdf. Updated December 2016. Accessed February 28, 2018.

Durrani SR, Busse WW. Management of asthma in adolescents and adults. In: Adkinson NF Jr, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55.

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Review Date: 2/18/2018

Reviewed By: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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